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Links: July 12-17

A whole host of links covering everything from China to Vicks VapoRub (no, really). Look forward to a sports-only links post later in the week.

When You’re Poor, Money Is Expensive: For tens of millions of Americans without a bank account, paying a bill isn’t just an odyssey. It’s a part-time job.  (The Atlantic)

Tangled Web of Memories Lingers After a Breakup: The last thing I remember was the tears running in rivulets down my cheek as I confirmed that, yes, I did want to delete the picture on my Facebook page.  Several hours later, I, grossly hung over, was awoken by a flash flood of the rising sun through my hotel room. My face looked like Bubble Wrap after I fell asleep (likely with a thud) on the carpeted floor. And a bottle of whiskey, now empty, lay stranded amid a ruin of scrunched tissues, dried from my tears and snot, which sat in a makeshift shrine around me.  For a moment, as I started to piece together where I was, how I got there and what had happened the night before, I looked over at my laptop, which was clammed-open on the floor, and I felt sick to my stomach, not from the hangover but even worse, from what might be waiting to greet me on the Internet. (New York Times)

Naked selfies extracted from ‘factory reset’ phones: Thousands of pictures including “naked selfies” have been extracted from factory-wiped phones by a Czech Republic-based security firm. (BBC)

Why Google’s Waze Is Trading User Data With Local Governments: In Rio de Janeiro most eyes are on the final, nail-biting matches of the World Cup. Over in the command center of the city’s department of transport though, they’re on a different set of screens altogether.  Planners there are watching the aggregated data feeds of thousands of smartphones being walked or driven around a city, thanks to two popular travel apps, Waze and Moovit.  The goal is traffic management, and it involves swapping data for data. More cities are lining up to get access, and while the data the apps are sharing is all anonymous for now, identifying details could get more specific if cities like what they see, and people become more comfortable with being monitored through their smartphones in return for incentives. (Forbes)

Vicks VapoRub and Me: How the nostril-stinging salve helps me overcome chronic olfactory sensitivity, an Object Lesson (The Atlantic)

Getting Fired for a FOIA: A Chicago crime reporter, cold cases and more. (On The Media)

A New Narrative on Israel-Palestine: The latest surge of violence in the Gaza Strip and Israel was fueled by a horrific series of events involving Israeli and Palestinian teenagers. Brooke talks with Philip Weiss, co-editor of Mondoweiss, about coverage of these recent events, and how the view of the conflict is shifting in the media. (On The Media)

Behind the Border Crisis: For the past few weeks the media have been reporting on a surge in unaccompanied minors who are crossing the border illegally, bringing attention to the latest immigration crisis. But the reality of the situation is far more complicated. Brooke talks with reporter Bob Ortega about what’s really happening on the border. (On The Media)

George Clooney Is Right About the Daily Mail: The world’s most popular online newspaper does not deserve to be taken seriously. (Slate)

Watch: Sneaky Octopus Dismantles Camera: A sneaky octopus tried to literally steal the show when he recently took apart a camera off the coast of Jacksonville, Florida. (National Geographic)

Nature’s Most Perfect Killing Machine: Ebola is nightmare fuel: a biological doomsday device conspiring with our bodies to murder us in uniquely gruesome fashion. It’s also killed fewer than 2,000 people. How has a virus with such a modest body count so fiercely captured the darkest corners of our imagination? (Hazlitt/Random House)

A moth, a fern, a feline: a species name story (Lyman Entomological Museum)

What Will America Look Like in 2024? 25 charts that show what the nation expects over the next 10 years (The Atlantic)

Sandra Fluke: The Hobby Lobby case is an attack on women: How is birth control different from blood transfusions and vaccines? It’s not. (Washington Post)

In Hong Kong, a Potent Visual Echo of Tiananmen: Cecilia Ng was born seven years after the Goddess of Democracy statue in Tiananmen Square was destroyed during the bloody 1989 suppression of student-led protests. A quarter-century after the crackdown in Beijing, she and 10 of her friends made a smaller replica of the statue that on Tuesday was planted in the middle of one of central Hong Kong’s busiest streets. (Sinosphere/NYT)

Data Doppelgängers and the Uncanny Valley of Personalization: Why customized ads are so creepy, even when they miss their target (The Atlantic)

Understanding Facebook’s Lost Generation of Teens: The social network’s struggle to woo kids isn’t because it’s also their parents’ favorite social network (Fast Company)

How’s My Driving?: Car insurance companies want to track your every move—and you’re going to let them. (Quartz)

The Brilliant Machine That Could Finally Fix Airport Security: That machine is the Qylatron Entry Experience Solution, and it could soon replace a crappy experience of going through security checks at airports and other venues with one that’s faster and less invasive. Instead of having a human poke around in your bag, the machine scans it for a variety of threats in just a few seconds. Searching those Aussies and other soccer fans may prove to be a watershed moment for the system, a successful test of how well it can spot trouble and move people through security, efficiently and with their dignity intact. (Wired)

Spies Like Us: Is it because they know us so little — or because they know us too well — that the Americans can’t stop spying on us Germans? (New York Times)

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