Thursday Ten

Today’s links include several very long reads and I’m sorry about that first link. I know it’s depressing, but if there are some gems as well (especially the two sets of photography links).

10 Ways The World Will Get Worse In 2015  The World Economic Forum isn’t optimistic about the planet’s prospects for a happy new year. (Fast Company/Co.Exist) Note: Let’s get this one out of the way first.

Whipping Boy A writer spends forty years looking for his bully. Why? (New Yorker)

‘Serial’ and White Reporter Privilege On cringing through the mystery. (The Awl) Note: Though I’m part of podcast myself and people have rec’d this one to me, I never found the time to start and now I’m glad I didn’t.

Related: The Problem With “Serial” And The Model Minority Myth It needs a “bad” minority to balance the scales. Hello, Jay. (Spoilers for anyone who hasn’t listened to Episode 8.) (BuzzFeed)

The Dreadful Inconvenience of Salad A start-up will contribute an interesting answer to the million-dollar food-policy question: If healthy food was as easy as junk food, would we eat more of it? (The Atlantic)

The Truth About Anonymous’s Activism A look behind the mask reveals a naïve techno-utopianism. (The Nation)

The Ebola Wars How genomics research can help contain the outbreak. (The New Yorker) Note: Equal parts heartbreaking and heartening. Also, this article clearly shows how treatment changes depend on the color of your skin and where you live/where you’re from.

By Noon They’d Both Be In Heaven KELLI STAPLETON, whose teenage daughter was autistic and prone to violent rages, had come to fear for her life. So she made a decision that perhaps only she could justify (New York Magazine)

The Rise of Invisible Unemployment Three theories about today’s biggest economic mystery: If unemployment is shrinking, why aren’t wages growing? (The Atlantic)

The Unfinished Suburbs of America Thousands of acres across the country were partially developed during the housing boom. What should happen to them now? (The Atlantic)

Dear Kate: Living with Grief Following our daughter’s death, my husband and I saw no end to the grief. Yet we have somehow discovered meaning, hope, and even joy after life’s most terrible loss. (Indianapolis Monthly)

Bonus:

The Most Extraordinary Photos You’ve Never Seen Until now. Some months back, the agency’s photographers decided to look through all of their old, unpublished images to see what they might find. Perhaps unsurprisingly, given the quality of work Magnum’s roster continuously produces, they came up with an incredible collection. What follows is a selection of the imagery on sale (signed prints for just $100 each!) and a note from the photographer about his or her frame. (Esquire)

‘Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red’ This year marks the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I in 1914. On this year’s Armistice Day in London, a massive work of art dedicated to commonwealth servicemen and women lost a century ago reached its conclusion. The evolving installation, titled “Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red”, began back on July 17, with the placing of a single ceramic poppy in the moat of the Tower of London. (The Atlantic)

Lessons In Combining Art And Science (And Taking Amazing Photos) From Rockstar Astronaut Chris Hadfield Astronaut, social media expert, and music video star Chris Hadfield talks about art and science as two parts of one whole, and talks us through his eye-popping space photos. (Fast Company/Co.Create) Note: Now, don’t you feel better? I know I do.

The VHS-Era Internet (YouTube) Note: I want to watch some of these, but I haven’t yet.

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The Thursday Ten

Some of these are older links I’d forgotten to share before. Also, the Vincent van Gogh link is very long, but fascinating. There are also some pretty great links, like the one about cats and then there’s that one about Thor’s hammer.

  • NCIS: Provence: The Van Gogh: Mystery For many decades, suicide was the unquestioned final chapter of Vincent van Gogh’s legend. But in their 2011 book, Pulitzer Prize-winning biographers Steven Naifeh and Gregory White Smith offered a far more plausible scenario—that Van Gogh was killed—only to find themselves under attack. Now, with the help of a leading forensic expert, the authors take their case a step further. (Vanity Fair)
  • Why Banksy Is (Probably) a Woman: The world’s foremost street artist is a social justice warrior and a viral media master. She could be anyone. (City Lab) Note: Aside from a failure to understand what graffiti (street writing) is (it is not catcalling, fyi), this article is interesting. I wouldn’t call it good, but the author makes a decent argument for Banksy’s gender.
  • William Gibson: I never imagined Facebook The brilliant science-fiction novelist who imagined the Web tells Salon how writers missed social media’s rise (Salon) Note: My favorite article of the week because William Gibson. If you don’t understand … you don’t know me very well.

Thursday Ten (makes a comeback)

Yes, I’m back! With more depressing articles for your weekend. Please don’t hate me too much. This week there’s an article that will make you cry, another that will make you angry and one that will make you wonder what the world has come to. But, if you make it to the end, there’s some fun and interesting things waiting for you.

  • EXPOSED After an accidental needle stab, a doctor’s Ebola watch begins (Washington Post)
  • On Kindness: My mother is sick. (Matter/Medium) This is a phenomenal and heartbreaking read.
  • The Art of Not Working at Work At first, the ability to check email, read ESPN, or browse Zappos while on the job may feel like a luxury. But in time, many crave more meaningful—and more demanding—responsibilities. (The Atlantic)
  • The greatest story Reddit ever told (Kernal/Daily Dot) Note: I’m not a fan of Reddit at all, I rarely ever visit there, but this story is fascinating and, strangely, heartwarming.

Bonus:

  • The Internet Arcade: The Internet Arcade is a web-based library of arcade (coin-operated) video games from the 1970s through to the 1990s, emulated in JSMAME, part of the JSMESS software package. Containing hundreds of games ranging through many different genres and styles, the Arcade provides research, comparison, and entertainment in the realm of the Video Game Arcade. (Internet Archive)
  • These Secret Cold War Radio Stations Are Still Broadcasting: In the early days of espionage, long before the advent of burner phones, satcoms, and other modern-day spy gadgets, getting word to field agents—especially those working behind the Iron Curtain—proved a dangerous game with global consequences should the agent’s cover be blown. But that’s where number stations, and their uncrackable radio codes, come in. (Gizmodo)