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Reading Comics: The Beginnings

When I moved back home after I graduated from college (in 2000), I indulged myself. I got into NYSNC and the Backstreet Boys, I made friends with strangers on the internet* (some of them I’m still friends with to this day) and I read a lot of Robin comics. And then I stopped. I don’t know why. Maybe it was costing my unemployed self too much money, maybe I just stopped caring. I eventually moved out and in with my sister (in a larger city). We had no AC, so we went to bookstores (remember those?). She read books, I read Sandman. But that, too, stopped. I had a brief love affair with Prince of Tennis (I’m still occasionally plowing through those, though mostly online). But pretty much my comic and manga reading stopped. I moved near Detroit for library school and it was only in 2006 that I even broadened my fiction reading away from science fiction (and into Scandinavian mysteries and YA).

Once I became a librarian, I started to read more graphic novels. I mostly read things aimed at girls (Minx did a great collection of teen-focused female-centric graphic novels), but I sometimes read other things too. The Louvre collaborated with some French artists/authors and put out some graphic novels, so I read those. I read a couple of YA novel comic adaptations (rarely as good as books, though) and random things here or there. But I wasn’t a heavy graphic novel reader, mostly because I was too busy reading YA. A friend started recommending graphic novels to me in 2010, but again it was only an occasional thing. It wasn’t until the end of 2010 (with Locke & Key and Chew) that I started just looking things up on my own.  And then, suddenly, I was reading more. Maybe it coincided with my interest in kpop (though that was at the end of 2011), but I’ve been steadily reading more and more graphic novels.

I know, the subject of this post is comics and I promise I’ll get there, but let me talk about graphic novels. In the library world, we try to keep things simple. Not everyone agrees and some libraries have graphic novel collections, some have comics and some have manga — and some have all three. Over the years I’ve read all of the above, but never seriously and never regularly. But as 2011 went into 2012, I was doing both. I’d forgotten how much I enjoyed manga and discovered a whole new world out there (what with my interest in jdramas and how many of them start as manga or are turned into manga after they’ve been aired). But not comics. Why? It’s complicated.

My exposure to comics, prior to a few weeks ago was limited. Remember those Robin ones back in 2000? Yeah, I don’t either. I also picked up Marvel 1602, which I enjoyed without context. A patron tried to get me to read the Marvel Civil War series, but I wasn’t interested. Even after getting over my anti-RDJ bias and loving Iron Man, as well as the rest of the Marvel verse (though not Spider Man), I wasn’t really interested in comics. Hell, even when I was totally into the X-Men movies, I wasn’t interested in the comics. By the time I thought maybe I was, I felt it was too late. Comics are complicated and I’m a completionist. I need to read things in the right order and I need to read them from the beginning. You can’t necessarily do that with comics, there are too many story lines, too many back issues. I mean, maybe you could, but no one has that time or money — I certainly didn’t. So I quit again.

Until last week. I’d picked up the first volume of the Marvel comic Runaways a few weeks early and fallen in love. but after fighting with Wikipedia and library catalogs, I’d given up because I couldn’t figure out what to request next. Even though, prior to the second Captain America movie coming out, a friend had given me copies of some Cap comics. It wasn’t until a coworker of mine, at my new job, offered to loan me the first six Ms. Marvel issues that I thought about starting again. And start I did. I’ve since read the next two volumes in Runaways and I’m waiting on the remaining issues. And, after sorting out some confusing, I’ve also requested as much of the Young Avengers series as I can.

People often try to get me to like things. Sometimes it works (my return to loving kpop music was one of those things, thanks to my friend J) and sometimes it doesn’t or sometimes it just takes a long time. It took me four months to go through a music-related email from my friend A, because I just wasn’t ready. And the same applies to my interest in comics. I wanted to like comics, I wanted to love them, but every time I thought about reading those Captain America comics I have, it just made me tired. But now? Now I’m ready.

And that means I’m going to blog about it. You’re not going to find anything new here. You might not even find anything interesting, but it’s just a way for me to talk about getting into comics and what reading these means to me. I’ve always loved the medium, now I’m embracing it in all forms. I don’t necessarily know what I’m talking about; after all, I’m coming into this blind. The only history I have is through the movies — and that’s fine. It’s been several years since I really got a new fandom, so I’m ready. I hope y’all are ready for me.

This post is brought to you by this article from The Atlantic:  The Female Thor and the Female Comic-Book Reader

*My first foray into making friends on the internet was in the early 90s, in the pre-web days. I was on MUDs and MUSHs and my first internet friends were a boy from Iceland (we’re Facebook friends now) and another from Germany (I have no idea what happened to him, but I will always fondly remember Mark, because he used to send me letters at band camp). That was only the beginning, and even today, I’m still making friends with strangers on the internet.

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