Music Sundays: SHINee – Tell Me What To Do

Of of 2017’s best album of 2016, 1and1, enjoy this SHINee song. I know I do every time I listen to it. It’s so good (just like the group).

I schedule these posts in advance, but the day this posts appears, I will hopefully be watching SHINee live and in concert!

You can also listen to the whole album (and I can’t recommend it enough) at Spotify:

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Self-Care Friday (Week 6)

No musical reviews for you this week, though I did watch Camelot (dumb, but amusing) and Cabaret (fantastic) with my parents. As you may have noticed if you follow me on twitter or Facebook, I was without power from Wednesday of last week until Sunday (technically Saturday, but I was not home then). I ended up driving up to visit my parents on Thursday night and spending the weekend there. It was a lot of fun, in spite of my worries about the power outages in SE Michigan.

What I’ve Been Reading:

I have no finished any more Read Harder challenges this week, but I should finish at least one by next Friday.

Completed:

  • Magic Breaks by Ilona Andrews (Kate Daniels, Book 7)
  • One Salt Sea by Seanan McGuire (auido book: October Daye, Book 5)

Reading:

  • Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin
  • The Dark Forest by Cixin Liu (audio book – on hold)
  • Chapelwood: the Borden dispatches by Cherie Priest
  • Under the Midnight Sun by Keigo Higashino
  • Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler

What I’m watching:

I completed Voice earlier this week and there will be a review next week, keep an eye out for it. I really can’t wait to write about Tokyo Tarareba Musume, but I’m not finished with yet. I have three episodes left (8, 9, & 10) but the final two episodes are not subbed yet. I’m also working on what kdramas to watch next, I’ve had two suggestions: Oh My Ghost and Strong Woman Do Bong Soon. I might try one or both of them, the two kdramas I’m waiting for (Man to Man and Ruler) don’t start until April and May, respectively, so I have some time. I also have some movies to watch, but I’ll talk about them next week.

  • Tokyo Tarareba Musume (Japanese drama)
  • Totsuzen Desu ga, Ashita Kekkon Shimasu (Japanese drama)

What I’ve been listening to:

I’m still obsessed with BLANC7’s mini album, Prism (Google Play). It’s really great music to work to and I can’t stop listening. But I have listened to a few other things:

  • B.A.P – Rose (mini album)
  • Viction – all of their albums
  • BTOB – Feel’eM

In honor of see SHINee this Sunday (!!), here’s a photo from the last time I saw them (May of last year). It’s crappy, I know, but still. Enjoy!

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SHINee @ Rosemont (Chicago) – 5/8/2016

 

The Wednesday Four

Last week was something else. Wednesday was A Day Without Women, our President released his health care “plan” and so many things happened. I missed a lot of it due to being out of town because Southeast Michigan, where I live, was hit with a huge windstorm and myself, along with around a million others, lost power. I have power again and it’s very nice. It was a sharp reminder how quickly our world can change. Stay safe, everyone. Stay warm (or cool, depending where you are).

Here is week 17.

Due to the above mentioned issues, I haven’t read many articles recently, so here are more old ones. Including one about one of my most favorite movies, Chungking Express. If you haven’t seen it, please do, it’s fantastic.

  • In Dreams: 20 Years of ‘Chungking Express’ (mxdwn)
  • William Gibson Sees the Future: But he’s not trying to predict it. (Slate) Note: Gibson is my favorite author and I loved The Peripheral, which is what this article is partially about. 
  • Did My Best Friend Really Know Me? For 27 years, the writer had a dutiful relationship with her most devoted friend. Only later did she question who needed who more. (Dame)
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Tony Leung Chiu Wai in Chungking Express

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Faye Wong in Chungking Express

Book Review: Reykjavík Nights by Arnaldur Indriðason

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I am a huge fan of Indriðason’s Inspector Erlendur series. There’s something compelling about his writing style and the characters in the series. Not just Erlendur, but the the people who surround him. In fact, Indriðason has written two books who are tangentially about Erlendur, but are in truth about the two detectives he works with. In Reykjavík Nights we are treated not to a story about Erlendur the inspector but instead Erlendur the 20something (I think he’s 26) traffic cop.

Note: Don’t read this book unless you’ve the rest of the series. If you want to read Erlendur’s series, start with Jar City, the earliest book in the series to have been translated into English.

Reykjavík Nights follows the beginning of Erlendur’s path toward the detective we’re familiar with. This Erlendur is has no true experience solving crimes, he’s young and without a family of his own. While he has no wife or daughter, the baggage he does carry is the same that haunts him throughout the whole series.

Spoilers: The disappearance and probable death of Erlendur’s brother in a snowstorm, when they were both young, follows him, haunting him in at age 26. We learn that this loss has truly shaped him as a detective, in fact, the main case of Reykjavík Nights is only solved because of Erlendur’s obsession with missing people. End Spoilers

The novel is differs from the usual style of Indriðason’s Inspector Erlendur series. Instead of following Erlendur and his team as they try to solve a murder of some kind, we’re treated to two stories without. Reykjavík Nights has two halves: a procedural Law & Order type story line and an overarching crime that Erlendur must solve. The title of the novel itself is really only half the story, but this is not a bad thing

As a big fan of Law & Order, this novel read a bit like the Reykjavik version of that show — except that the characters (and Erlendur especially) were very well developed. We are treated to Erlendur’s experiences as a traffic/beat cop on the streets of Reykjavik. He works the night shift, hence the title, and Indriðason fills chapters with the exploits of Erlendur and his two partners. That sounds boring, but instead it’s the opposite. As much as I wanted to know what was happening in the other half of the story, these tales of the night shift serve a larger purpose, showing how ordinary people can sometimes become entangled in larger stories without even realizing it.

674a867a74ae92cb4f94dd57ee606451As always, I enjoyed the way Indriðason ties everything together. The larger crime is twofold — the death of a homeless man Erlendur met on the night shift and a woman who went missing around the same time the homeless man died. These two seemingly independent stories draw Erlendur in and we watch as he slowly begins to unravel them and eventually figure out what happened and how they’re connected. While the night shift stories are good, it is this second plot where the novel truly shines. We are treated to Erlendur, the budding inspector. But unlike the later series, this Erlendur doesn’t know what he’s doing, he messes things up, and he has to work alone. And yet, just as we expect, he does solve the mysteries he’s stumbled upon.

Reykjavík Nights is a treat for Erlendur fans and I am so happy it’s been translated into English. If you’ve read the rest of the series, definitely pick up Reykjavík Nights. While it’d still be a good read if you’re not familiar with the series, I would still recommend starting with Jar City. Regardless, I truly enjoyed this book and I cannot wait to read Into Oblivion, the follow up book to Reykjavík Nights.

Self-Care Friday (Week 5)

Sorry, this one is late due to many things.

Last week I talked about watching some musicals and one of those was Annie Get Your Gun. I knew, going in, that this musical was not a great one. I also expected it to be racist and sexist, but I honestly didn’t really know what I was in for. You can read my full review over on Letterboxd, but suffice to say that I pretty much only gave it one star because I like some of the songs.

Anyway, onto the actual, fun things.

What I’ve Been Reading:

  • Reader Harder:
    • Read an LGBTQ+ romance novel: The Magpie Lord by K.J. Charles
  • Completed:
    • Reykjavik Nights by Arnaldur Indriðason (audio book on CD)
  • Reading:
    • Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin
    • The Dark Forest by Cixin Liu (audio book – on hold)
    • Chapelwood: the Borden dispatches by Cherie Priest
    • Under the Midnight Sun by Keigo Higashino
    • Magic Breaks by Ilona Andrews
    • One Salt Sea by Seanan McGuire (audio book)

What I’m watching:

The most recent two episodes of Voice have gotten really intense. There are only two more left. I can’t wait to find out what happens.

  • Voice (Korean drama)
  • Tokyo Tarareba Musume (Japanese drama)
  • Totsuzen Desu ga, Ashita Kekkon Shimasu (Japanese drama)
  • Cabaret
  • Camelot

What I’m listening to:

  • Women of Fresh Finds (Spotify Playlist)
  • Blade Runner OST
  • Arrival OST
  • Perfume – Tokyo Girl (theme to Tokyo Tarareba Musume)

  • Subin

And her new song:

 

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This is Kihyun, of the boy group Monsta X. They are one of my favorite groups and coming back soon. I’m going to try to include pictures of some kind, from now on, that make me happy. This teaser photo of Kihyun is one of those images! Look forward (maybe … you may not be doing that, actually, but shhh) to more (probably kpop related) photos. 

The Wednesday Four

Last week, huh? I’m ready to watch Hunt For Red October or some Sean Connery as James Bond movies. Anyway.

Each week things get worse and worse: Week 16

The links. Please enjoy the story of Keanu Reeves and then read Gail Simone’s Grand Unified Keanu Theory. And yes, I am a fan and have been for quite some time.

  • The Myth of Police Reform: The real problem is the belief that all our social problems can be solved with force. (The Atlantic)
  • Scorched Earth, 2200AD: Climate change has done its worst, and now just 500 million humans remain on lifeboats in the north. How do they survive? (Aeon)
Jack Rabbit

Jack Rabbit (c) Linda Tanner