Self-Care Friday (Week 7)

I finished another kdrama this week! My friend N and I, who saw SHINee together on Sunday, finished Moon Lovers: Scarlet Heart Ryeo on Sunday (before our concert, actually). It premiered back in August of last year and took us until now to finish it. It was 20 episodes and I plan to write up a review for next week. Suffice to say, we both enjoyed it for the most part.

I did not watch any new movies this week, alas. I was too busy with other things (like traveling!) but my dad is coming to visit me this weekend and I have a bunch of movies (including a musical) to watch. Anyway, onto the good stuff.

What I’ve Been Reading:

Reader Harder:

  • Read a book in which a character of color goes on a spiritual journey: Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler
  • Read a classic by an author of color: Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin

Completed:

  • Black Panther: a Nation Under Our Feet. Book One by Ta-Nehisi Coates and Brian Stelfreeze
  • Ashes of Honor by Seanan McGuire (audio book: October Daye, Book 6)
  • What Did You Eat Yesterday volume 9 by Fumi Yoshinaga

Reading:

  • The Dark Forest by Cixin Liu (audio book – on hold)
  • Chapelwood: the Borden dispatches by Cherie Priest
  • Under the Midnight Sun by Keigo Higashino
  • Black Panther: a Nation Under Our Feet. Book Two by Ta-Nehisi Coates and Brian Stelfreeze
  • Chimes At Midnight by Seanan McGuire (audio book: October Daye, Book 7)
  • See You In The Cosmos by Jack Cheng

What I’m Watching:

I haven’t started any new kdramas yet, but that’ll happen soon. Next week some time, I’m sure. I will also include the movies I watch in next week’s update.

Completed:

  • Moon Lovers: Scarlet Heart Ryeo (kdrama)

Currently:

  • Tokyo Tarareba Musume (Japanese drama)
  • Totsuzen Desu ga, Ashita Kekkon Shimasu (Japanese drama)

Upcoming:

  • Oh My Ghost (kdrama)
  • Strong Woman Do Bong Soon (kdrama)

What I’m Listening To:

I’m going to try a bit of a different format this time, so bare with me (similar, but also different).

SHINee of course! I saw them on Sunday night and it was fantastic! I feel very lucky to have seen them live. It was so good. Hopefully they’ll release a DVD and album of our concert, or at least one of the North American ones. Anyway, to listen to SHINee now, check your favorite streaming sites or go to Spotify:

Next up: BLANC7 as usual! I can’t get enough of them. Listen on Google Play.

And last up, one of my most favorite groups EVER: Monsta X! First of all, check out the music video for their new song, Beautiful (off of their new album, more about that below):

I love them a lot, y’all! Anyway, you can listen to their new song on Google Play or on Spotify and I cannot recommend it enough! Their new album is by far and away the best of their releases (and their stuff is pretty good all around). It’s 10 songs (!!!) and it makes me so happy. I’m really excited about this album and I hope they do well. I also hope they come to the US, because they’re one of the few groups that I want to see and haven’t yet seen. Please, Starship!

Anyway, give it a listen on Spotify (since it’s not embedding right now).

And, lastly, a photo to get you through the day. I went to the SHINee concert with Taemin as my favorite, but left with the guy below as my favorite. What are you going to do? It happens. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

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Choi Minho in Toronto (3/19/2017) (c) FATAL (sources: here and here)

The Wednesday Four

This week’s links are a mess of things, nothing directly related to current events, so enjoy them, please. I did find them all interesting (and some even entertaining).

Week 18 is over and aren’t we all glad. It’s not like things could get worse. Oh, wait …

  • Death Is Optional A Conversation: Yuval Noah Harari, Daniel Kahneman (Edge) Note: This was sent to me a few years ago by my father, I believe. 
  • Sir Arthur and the Fairies In the spring of 1920, at the beginning of a growing fascination with spiritualism brought on by the death of his son and brother in WWI, Arthur Conan Doyle took up the case of the Cottingley Fairies. Mary Losure explores how the creator of Sherlock Holmes became convinced that the ‘fairy photographs’ taken by two girls from Yorkshire were real. (Public Domain Review)
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SHINee World in Toronto (c) snowxbunnyjeon on Twitter

Series Review: Voice (OCN)

I haven’t talked about a kdrama (Korean drama/tv show) on this blog in a long time, it’s about time I did it again. So, enjoy this review!

파일-보이스_포스터If you know anything about me, you may have noticed that I really like crime dramas (and books). I’m not sure when this started or why I like them so much, but I do. Whenever a new I read about new kdramas, if they’re crime-related, I usually am interested. When I read the synopsis, I knew I wanted to watch it:

Two detectives teamed up to catch a serial killer who murdered their family. Moo Jin Hyuk’s life spiraled out of control after his wife was murdered. He starts to put himself together after he meets Kang Kwon Joo, US-graduated voice-profiler, who lost her police father to the same serial killer. They work together on the 112 (emergency telephone number) call center team.

Serial killer shows also intrigue me (ex: Gap Dong, Signal, and, to some extent, Bad Guys) and so that just sealed the deal for me. The who is, in fact, about Jin Hyuk and Kwon Joo’s hunt for the serial killer who killed their loved ones, but it’s actually more than just that. The serial killer storyline is what brings the two characters together and it’s the overarching theme that runs through each episode, but it’s not what brings the show together. Instead, that is left in the hands of the characters whole make up the call center and the detectives who solve the crimes the call sender sends their way.

Spoilers for the entire show (16 episodes) to follow.

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Jin Hyuk

Jin Hyuk’s characters is call “mad dog” (at least in the English subs on Dramafever) because he’s kind of nuts — but he also doggedly (lol) gets the job done. The show begins with Jin Hyuk and his team solving a crime and then celebrating a job well done while a woman is being stalked in the shadows. She calls someone, who doesn’t answer, and then she calls 112 (911) and Kwon Joo picks up. It turns out that the person on the phone is Jin Hyuk’s wife and he’s the one she called first. He was too bus, both catching the bad guy and then celebrating to answer the phone. His wife is killed and we suffer his guilt and grief alongside him.

We skip to the trial, a man’s arrested for the murder, but all is not as it seems. A woman, Kwon Joo (though we don’t know it’s her) arrives to testify. She explains that she heard the killer’s voice when he killed her father (a cop) and she knows the man they have on trial isn’t the murder. She asks them to play the recording of her conversation with the killer, but it’s gone — erased. The man gets off and Jin Hyuk goes crazy.

We skip three years and this is where the drama truly beings. Jin Hyuk is back to being a glorified traffic cop and Kwon Joo has just returned from life in the United States. She is assigned to the same police station where Jin Hyuk works, determined to find out who killed her father and Jin Hyuk’s wife. She forms what is called the Golden Time Team, which consists of the 112 call center and detectives who solve the crimes that come in. She insists that Jin Hyuk be part of the time and this is the first part of the drama of the show.

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Kwon Joo

Kwon Joo wants to work with Jin Hyuk, but he wants nothing to do with her. He reluctantly begins solving the crimes she throws at him and this is the basis for each episode, except the very last one. There are threads of the serial killer search throughout the show, but the central plot of each episode revolves around cases that come into the 112 line. Similar to a “case of the week” show (like Law & Order or Person of Interest), the Golden Time Team must save people before it’s too late. The beginning of each episode resolves the case of the previous episode and the second half introduces the next case, all mixed up with the search for serial killer.

Some of the cases are tied to the serial killer directly, some not so much. It is through these cases, and the frank honest between Kwon Joo and Jin Hyuk, that they grow to trust each other. Really, that Jin Hyuk learns to trust Kwon Joo. She convinces him that she’s not nuts — her story is that when she was younger, she was gravely ill and lost her sight for many years. During her period of blindness, she honed her hearing and now it is exceptionally good. This is the only true part of the show that is not quite believable, but without it, this show wouldn’t work. I decided, almost immediately, that I didn’t care if this part didn’t seem real, it works too well for me to care.

Once Jin Hyuk grudgingly trusts Kwon Joo, their hunt for the murderer of her father and his husband begins in earnest. While they solve crimes each week, we also slowly see them uncover the truth behind the murders. They uncover conspiracies, are thwarted at every turn and eventually discover a mole in the police.

Voice is a very dark drama. It’s actually darker than many kdramas I’ve seen, even the crime ones that I adore. The stories feel real, the anguish the victims and our cops feel is real, too. Even the emotions of the bad guys, with whom we do spend time, are very raw. There is back story, reasons for why people behave the way they do, and much of is heart breaking. For those of you who’ve read my reviews before, you know I like the “flower boy” detectives quite a bit and Shim Dae Shik is no exception. I adored him, but as with most of our characters, all is not what it seems.

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Jin Hyuk and Dae Shik

Another spoiler warning! Somewhere toward the middle of the show, maybe episode eight, I realized that they were going to make Dae Shik the mole. I didn’t want to be write, I loved his character, but unfortunately I was correct. He was the mole and his storyline just grew more and more upsetting.

Of course, we always knew how this drama was going to end, with the good guys bringing down the bad guys. The truth is that the way they got there was the interesting part. While not a perfect drama, it had all the elements I really enjoyed. Once I accepted how Kwon Joo’s hearing worked, everything else seemed more or less believable. It was a great drama, the acting was by far and away the best part of the show and is, to be honest, a reason to watch it.

I enjoyed Voice much more than I expected and am glad I watched it. Perhaps for my next kdrama I’ll go for something a bit more light hearted. Maybe.

 

 

Music Sundays: SHINee – Tell Me What To Do

Of of 2017’s best album of 2016, 1and1, enjoy this SHINee song. I know I do every time I listen to it. It’s so good (just like the group).

I schedule these posts in advance, but the day this posts appears, I will hopefully be watching SHINee live and in concert!

You can also listen to the whole album (and I can’t recommend it enough) at Spotify:

Self-Care Friday (Week 6)

No musical reviews for you this week, though I did watch Camelot (dumb, but amusing) and Cabaret (fantastic) with my parents. As you may have noticed if you follow me on twitter or Facebook, I was without power from Wednesday of last week until Sunday (technically Saturday, but I was not home then). I ended up driving up to visit my parents on Thursday night and spending the weekend there. It was a lot of fun, in spite of my worries about the power outages in SE Michigan.

What I’ve Been Reading:

I have no finished any more Read Harder challenges this week, but I should finish at least one by next Friday.

Completed:

  • Magic Breaks by Ilona Andrews (Kate Daniels, Book 7)
  • One Salt Sea by Seanan McGuire (auido book: October Daye, Book 5)

Reading:

  • Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin
  • The Dark Forest by Cixin Liu (audio book – on hold)
  • Chapelwood: the Borden dispatches by Cherie Priest
  • Under the Midnight Sun by Keigo Higashino
  • Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler

What I’m watching:

I completed Voice earlier this week and there will be a review next week, keep an eye out for it. I really can’t wait to write about Tokyo Tarareba Musume, but I’m not finished with yet. I have three episodes left (8, 9, & 10) but the final two episodes are not subbed yet. I’m also working on what kdramas to watch next, I’ve had two suggestions: Oh My Ghost and Strong Woman Do Bong Soon. I might try one or both of them, the two kdramas I’m waiting for (Man to Man and Ruler) don’t start until April and May, respectively, so I have some time. I also have some movies to watch, but I’ll talk about them next week.

  • Tokyo Tarareba Musume (Japanese drama)
  • Totsuzen Desu ga, Ashita Kekkon Shimasu (Japanese drama)

What I’ve been listening to:

I’m still obsessed with BLANC7’s mini album, Prism (Google Play). It’s really great music to work to and I can’t stop listening. But I have listened to a few other things:

  • B.A.P – Rose (mini album)
  • Viction – all of their albums
  • BTOB – Feel’eM

In honor of see SHINee this Sunday (!!), here’s a photo from the last time I saw them (May of last year). It’s crappy, I know, but still. Enjoy!

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SHINee @ Rosemont (Chicago) – 5/8/2016

 

The Wednesday Four

Last week was something else. Wednesday was A Day Without Women, our President released his health care “plan” and so many things happened. I missed a lot of it due to being out of town because Southeast Michigan, where I live, was hit with a huge windstorm and myself, along with around a million others, lost power. I have power again and it’s very nice. It was a sharp reminder how quickly our world can change. Stay safe, everyone. Stay warm (or cool, depending where you are).

Here is week 17.

Due to the above mentioned issues, I haven’t read many articles recently, so here are more old ones. Including one about one of my most favorite movies, Chungking Express. If you haven’t seen it, please do, it’s fantastic.

  • In Dreams: 20 Years of ‘Chungking Express’ (mxdwn)
  • William Gibson Sees the Future: But he’s not trying to predict it. (Slate) Note: Gibson is my favorite author and I loved The Peripheral, which is what this article is partially about. 
  • Did My Best Friend Really Know Me? For 27 years, the writer had a dutiful relationship with her most devoted friend. Only later did she question who needed who more. (Dame)
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Tony Leung Chiu Wai in Chungking Express

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Faye Wong in Chungking Express

Book Review: Reykjavík Nights by Arnaldur Indriðason

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I am a huge fan of Indriðason’s Inspector Erlendur series. There’s something compelling about his writing style and the characters in the series. Not just Erlendur, but the the people who surround him. In fact, Indriðason has written two books who are tangentially about Erlendur, but are in truth about the two detectives he works with. In Reykjavík Nights we are treated not to a story about Erlendur the inspector but instead Erlendur the 20something (I think he’s 26) traffic cop.

Note: Don’t read this book unless you’ve the rest of the series. If you want to read Erlendur’s series, start with Jar City, the earliest book in the series to have been translated into English.

Reykjavík Nights follows the beginning of Erlendur’s path toward the detective we’re familiar with. This Erlendur is has no true experience solving crimes, he’s young and without a family of his own. While he has no wife or daughter, the baggage he does carry is the same that haunts him throughout the whole series.

Spoilers: The disappearance and probable death of Erlendur’s brother in a snowstorm, when they were both young, follows him, haunting him in at age 26. We learn that this loss has truly shaped him as a detective, in fact, the main case of Reykjavík Nights is only solved because of Erlendur’s obsession with missing people. End Spoilers

The novel is differs from the usual style of Indriðason’s Inspector Erlendur series. Instead of following Erlendur and his team as they try to solve a murder of some kind, we’re treated to two stories without. Reykjavík Nights has two halves: a procedural Law & Order type story line and an overarching crime that Erlendur must solve. The title of the novel itself is really only half the story, but this is not a bad thing

As a big fan of Law & Order, this novel read a bit like the Reykjavik version of that show — except that the characters (and Erlendur especially) were very well developed. We are treated to Erlendur’s experiences as a traffic/beat cop on the streets of Reykjavik. He works the night shift, hence the title, and Indriðason fills chapters with the exploits of Erlendur and his two partners. That sounds boring, but instead it’s the opposite. As much as I wanted to know what was happening in the other half of the story, these tales of the night shift serve a larger purpose, showing how ordinary people can sometimes become entangled in larger stories without even realizing it.

674a867a74ae92cb4f94dd57ee606451As always, I enjoyed the way Indriðason ties everything together. The larger crime is twofold — the death of a homeless man Erlendur met on the night shift and a woman who went missing around the same time the homeless man died. These two seemingly independent stories draw Erlendur in and we watch as he slowly begins to unravel them and eventually figure out what happened and how they’re connected. While the night shift stories are good, it is this second plot where the novel truly shines. We are treated to Erlendur, the budding inspector. But unlike the later series, this Erlendur doesn’t know what he’s doing, he messes things up, and he has to work alone. And yet, just as we expect, he does solve the mysteries he’s stumbled upon.

Reykjavík Nights is a treat for Erlendur fans and I am so happy it’s been translated into English. If you’ve read the rest of the series, definitely pick up Reykjavík Nights. While it’d still be a good read if you’re not familiar with the series, I would still recommend starting with Jar City. Regardless, I truly enjoyed this book and I cannot wait to read Into Oblivion, the follow up book to Reykjavík Nights.