The Wednesday Four

Hey, it’s been 27 Weeks, over half a year and … it feels like it’s been twice that long. Week 27 was out of control. I told a few people that it used to be thing a day, but now it feels like 500. A few minutes later I joked about remembering what it was like when there was only one thing a week that was destroying our democracy. My, how things have changed and not for the better.

The links!

Resist. Tax Day March 2017. Detroit, MI.

Resist. Tax Day March 2017. Detroit, MI. (c) Kathy Drasky

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The Wednesday Four

Here is Week 23. What I did this week was attend the March for Science in downtown Detroit with some friends. It was good, there were some decent speakers and we walked down Woodward. You can see some of the photos I took over on my Instagram.

As for the links? Everything old is new again as in I’m digging in the bottom of my pile of articles to read and have pulled four. Please enjoy them!

  • Fewer Americans Are Visiting Local Libraries—and Technology Isn’t to Blame
    Only one trend is closely associated with their use. (The Atlantic) Note: The reason may not surprise you!
  • A Lost Scottish Island, George Orwell, and the Future of Maps A 141 square-mile island vanished from Google Maps, and the company has yet to restore it. What do glitches mean for little-known places? (The Atlantic | CityLab) Note: If you look on google maps, Jura is back, but this article is still fun and interesting.
  • Taxonomy: The spy who loved frogs To track the fate of threatened species, a young scientist must follow the jungle path of a herpetologist who led a secret double life. (Nature) Note: I recommend listening to the podcast (about 13 minutes) as well as reading the article. Also, I have mixed feelings about specimen collection and those feelings were not changed by this article.
  • How Andrew Carnegie Turned His Fortune Into A Library Legacy (NPR) Note: Two library articles in one post! You’d think I was still a librarian.
Howell Carnegie District Library

Howell Carnegie District Library in Howell, MI. Photo (c) Paul Cooper

A few years ago a (now former) coworker and I went to Howell to hear an author speak and we walked to this library, although it was closed and we couldn’t go inside. Maybe next time.

The Wednesday Four (12/14/16)

Though I am no longer a librarian in my work life, I will always have a soft spot for libraries (and I visit all the time to chat with my old coworkers as well as to check out books). And in the spirit of librarianship, there are two articles one (the Time article) is an old article, but the second (EFF) is recent and reflects certain changing aspects of our society.

  • How Black Lives Matter Went Global: Activists for black, brown, and Indigenous rights around the world have adopted the Black Lives Matter slogan alongside homegrown movements against racism and police brutality. (BuzzFeed)
Blowing snow on the river

Blowing snow on the river (02/14/2-15) © ellenm1

The Wednesday Four (11/30/16)

A mixed bag today, just in time for that awkward few weeks between Thanksgiving and Christmas. Enjoy the links.

  • The Rise of Pirate Libraries: Shadowy digital libraries want to hold all the world’s knowledge and give it away for free. (Atlas Obscura)

 

 

does this make me a bad person or a good librarian?

While on lunch break at work (in our muggy and hot library, damn you, a/c), I was checking greader and discovered that Adam Yauch (of the Beastie Boys) had died. My first thought was about how shitty it is to die of cancer and how young he was (47). But my second thought, and the reason behind this post, was something along the lines of ‘oh, man, I get to do a display!’ Which makes me feel kind of gross, in a way, but it’s something I do often (displays when famous or relatively famous people die). For example, in the past month I did displays for Mike Wallace and Dick Clark.

What I can’t decide is if this is a kind of morbid thing to do (and if so, I’m totally blaming my undergrad Religious Studies professor who had a morbid sense of humor and taught our class about the end of the world — seriously) or if I just love putting up displays. I know what you’re thinking and I know this whole debate is ridiculous. But I have to confess to being a tiny bit excited when someone famous dies — because I can do a display. It’s not like I want them to die — but I sort of take advantage of it — though granted I’m doing it to get people to check out books/music/movies/etc.

And that brings me to the topic of displays. I don’t have any pictures handy, but usually my displays consist of a plastic stand with a flyer (8.5×11) that I made (usually color, but not always) and, in the case of a person’s death, biographical information from Biography In Context (which one of my libraries* subscribes to) as well as any obituary information I can print off the internet (usually from the New York Times and the Guardian). Alongside the papers and sign, there are books and media (in the case of Adam Yauch, our collection of Beastie Boy** cds is included, as well as a book on the Beastie Boys). For both Dick Clark and Mike Wallace, it was just books, biographical information and obits.

One of the reasons I love doing this is because I really love doing displays. I know a lot of people don’t understand what’s so great about them, but there’s something weirdly pleasing about researching a topic or a person and gathering a bunch of info. Maybe, at heart, I’m more of a research librarian, but working in a public library sometimes lets me do a little of both. Displays are satisfying to create, to see and curate. But what makes them even better is when the books get checked out (our Titanic display, complete with a poster of Leo & Kate and free gold 3D glasses (courtesy of the studio re-releasing of the film) was a huge hit). Of course, it’s even better when a staff member or a patron tells me how much they like my displays.

I guess what I’ve come to realize, while writing this entry (and thanks to an email from a good friend/librarian) is that it’s probably pretty normal and thoughtful. It’s less morbid than celebratory and in the end, isn’t that what this displays are about? And, hey, if it gets people to check shit out from the library, then that’s all the better.

As an aside, my other displays this month (so far!) are for the Kentucky Derby/Horse racing and National Bike Month. See what I mean? I’ll look for any reason to make a display. The more, the better and it seems to be a hit, too.

*I plan to refer to them as library #1 and library #2. Library #1 is located in an urbanish downtown location, along a bus route and within walking distance for many patrons. Library #2 is more rural, though in the same county, and almost all patrons drive to the library. #1 is much more liberal than #2 — but both libraries (as libraries are wont to do) have their own share of drama.

**I was really happy to see that library #1 had four Beastie Boys cds.