The Wednesday Four

Week 22 brings us every closer to World War 3 or the end of the world, or perhaps both (or neither, should we be lucky — are you feeling lucky?)

To make up for that, have an article about The Rock aka Dwayne Johnson and some really beautiful artwork of birds. And some other stuff, too.

  • Toxic Shock: Why This Woman Is Suing a Tampon Company After Losing Her Leg (Vice)
  • The Lock Pickers Victorian England made the strongest locks in the world—until an American showed up and promised he could pick them. (Slate)
Baseball

Baseball (c) Andy B

The Wednesday Four

A lot happened in Week 19. One of the things was good, the rest … well, you know. And on this line of thinking, there is so much news that a few minutes, an hour, a whole night, away from your phone (or the news in general) feels like a vacation. My dad visited me last weekend and I didn’t spend a lot of time on my phone or looking at the news, but when I did, it was like getting crushed. BuzzFeed wrote a really great article about this, which you can read:

It doesn’t necessarily offer any solutions, but it does help to know that we’re all in this together. And now onto the links.

June 15,2007

blue jay. (c) Heather Kaiser

The Wednesday Four (08/26/15)

After nearly a month long hiatus, the Wednesday Four are back! Let’s get to it.

bad weather on the Serengeti plains

 bad weather on the Serengeti plains (photo (c) Anna)

The Wednesday Four (07/29/15)

I really like the second article because I find any discussions about evolution to be interesting.

  • The Post-Ownership Society How the “sharing economy” allows Millennials to cope with downward mobility, and also makes them poorer. (Washington Monthly)
White arctic wolf

White arctic wolf: Very nice Arctic wolf (originally from Canada), relaxing on a rock (photo (c) Tambako The Jaguar)

The Wednesday Four (04/22/15)

Hey, look, some links!

  • The future of loneliness  As we moved our lives online, the internet promised an end to isolation. But can we find real intimacy amid shifting identities and permanent surveillance? (Guardian)

As someone who has a social life divided by the internet and the physical world, I found the first article to be fascinating, if somewhat ill-informed. I truly believe that friendships you make online are just as real as those you make in person. Actually, I don’t just believe this, I know it. I have several very close friends who I only know through the internet. I’ve met a couple of them in person and I was the bridesmaid in another’s wedding. But there are others who I may never meet, as we live oceans apart. This doesn’t devalue our friendships in any way, shape or form.

I believe the crux of the problem is relying on the idea that followers on social media are the same as tangible friends — the ones you talk to (you may email them every day, or every week, month or even once or twice a year — but they are your friends and not just people you happen to know). I have over 100 followers (each) on twitter, tumblr and on Facebook. I would only consider a handful of these to be actual friends and of those, even fewer who are close friends. If you confuse friendship and followers, then you’re missing two things: the point of social media is not to create a super large group of actual friends and friendships cannot be bound or determined by anything other than the relationship between two people. I feel that the author, at the end of the article, came to realize that it is the quality of the friendships, not the quantity of the ‘friends’ that really matters.

Monday Links

Here are some links that I’ve come across over the past few days.

The Apollo 11 Journey in Photographs (The Atlantic): Some pretty cool photographs of Apollo and the day Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walked on the moon. Including the photo to the left

Alone in the Ocean (Now I Know): A short article about a whale, called the 52 Hertz whale, who speaks at a different frequency than other whales and is, therefore, forever alone. Poor guy, though he/she seems to be surviving just fine, somehow.

Jane McGonigal: The game that can give you 10 extra years of life (TED): I think I was linked to this via Library Link of the Day, but I don’t remember. It’s a 20 minute video about McGonigal, who designs games, and figured out a way to make our lives better. I actually recommend the video because it’s interesting, kind of cute and really fun(ny).

Guest Post: The Truth Behind TSA Backscanners: Are They Safe? (Smaller Questions): A surprisingly interesting and easy to understand post about the scanners we go through at the airport. I completely agree with this part of the post as well:

The individual cancer risk from this amount of radiation pales in comparison to lifestyle risk factors for cancer like smoking, diet, and fitness.  However, one of the central tenets of radiation protection is a concept called ALARA – As Low As Reasonably Achievable.  The idea is that one should only use as much radiation as is needed, and no more.  Given that there is a perfectly good alternative that doesn’t use ionizing radiation (microwave-based scanner), in my opinion it is irresponsible to use radiation when it isn’t needed.

Living With Voices: A new way to deal with disturbing voices offers hope for those with other forms of psychosis (The American Scholar): I’m not that familiar with people who hear voices (external or internal), aside from what I’ve seen in TV shows (mostly likely wrong, too) so this article was both interesting and enlightening.

Deniers, disgust, and defamation (Bad Astronomy): My favorite Astronomer, Phil Plait, talks about the anti-science movement and how they’ve taken to personally attacking scientists (because they can’t attack the science). It’s pretty gross, but at least people are standing up against them.

And, finally, have a picture of a newly born baby manatee (to a rescued mother) and a series of photos of Kang Daesung, my favorite member of the Korean group Big Bang, from a recent concert in Shanghai, China.