Weekend Reads

These are late, but please spend some time reading. Also, if you can’t get to a protest, Wired has a bunch of things you can do to help:

Your weekend reads are below. I ran out of time to read all of these, but I plan to before the weekends up – and you should, too.

Notes – The NY Times, Wired, and Atlantic articles may have paywalls – if you run into them, try a different browser, incognito mode, a different device, or consider a subscription (I am debating subscribing to The Atlantic).

Please stay safe, stay healthy, and defund the police.

Wednesday Links: Black Lives Matter

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Weekend Reads

Before we get to the articles, please consider signing petitions, calling reps, and donating money to demand justice for George Floyd and Breonna Taylor’s deaths. Here are some links:

Now, onto the links.

The Public That Cannot Mourn Does Not Exist (The Convivial Society)

Yet, because so many have died in such a brief time, the tragedy takes on an undoubtedly collective and public character. It demands acknowledgement and a reckoning, not simply a tallying. As I write this, however, it begins to feel almost as if we’re prepared to move on. We were shocked on the first day that 100 died and later 1,000, but we somehow acclimated to anywhere from 1,500 to more than 2,000 deaths a day for a few weeks.

The Resillience of Marga Griesbach (The Cut)

Surviving It All: She’s 92, made it through the Holocaust, and set off for a cruise around the world in February.

Two heirs bought Midland dams as a tax shelter. Tragedy followed. (Bridge)

Eventually, a solution came to Mueller, an architect who lives in Las Vegas, and his cousin, Michel d’Avenas, a California musician who is the son of a French count and is now known as the Pebble Beach Bagpiper.

They would avoid taxes by purchasing four small hydroelectric dams in mid-Michigan near Midland, according to hundreds of pages of federal court records reviewed by Bridge.

The Bird Watcher, That Incident and His Feelings on the Woman’s Fate (New York Times – Possible Paywall)

Mr. Cooper’s love of birding began at age 10, he said, when his parents, two Long Island schoolteachers, enrolled him in a 4-H program. There, in a woodworking class, he crafted a bird feeder that he set in his lawn.

The man in the iron lung (Guardian)

When he was six, Paul Alexander contracted polio and was paralysed for life. Today he is 74, and one of the last people in the world still using an iron lung. But after surviving one deadly outbreak, he did not expect to find himself threatened by another

 

Baltimore orioles(c) pepperberryfarm: Baltimore orioles

Wednesday Links: 04/29/2020

Yes, we’re trying this again. I’m going to try something new – one or two relevant and timely links and one or two from the before time. I hope you can enjoy (?) these links.

Timely Links:

This is an excellent, thoughtful article that is also hard to read because there is so much we don’t know. I want to pull out one quote, the one that I hope you remember. It’s from the very end of the article:

And the desire to name an antagonist, be it the Chinese Communist Party or Donald Trump, disregards the many aspects of 21st-century life that made the pandemic possible: humanity’s relentless expansion into wild spaces; soaring levels of air travel; chronic underfunding of public health; a just-in-time economy that runs on fragile supply chains; health-care systems that yoke medical care to employment; social networks that rapidly spread misinformation; the devaluation of expertise; the marginalization of the elderly; and centuries of structural racism that impoverished the health of minorities and indigenous groups. It may be easier to believe that the coronavirus was deliberately unleashed than to accept the harsher truth that we built a world that was prone to it, but not ready for it.

I though this article was going to be a lot more depressing than it turned out to be. I think the US has a long way to go (and indeed, the headline on the main Buzzfeed news page reads like this: Contact Tracing Could Help Stop The Coronavirus. The US Might Blow It. There is some hope, but not enough (or a lot). Let’s just not give up and let’s keep fighting.

Links from the Before Time:

A truly excellent article from 2014 and it made a very interesting read, considering the flightless world we’re currently living in as well as our uncertain future. Spend some time remembering what it was like to fly (but never this nicely).

Your moment of calm:

Seven swans a swimming
Rachel Kramer: Seven swans a swimming

The Wednesday Four

A lot happened in Week 19. One of the things was good, the rest … well, you know. And on this line of thinking, there is so much news that a few minutes, an hour, a whole night, away from your phone (or the news in general) feels like a vacation. My dad visited me last weekend and I didn’t spend a lot of time on my phone or looking at the news, but when I did, it was like getting crushed. BuzzFeed wrote a really great article about this, which you can read:

It doesn’t necessarily offer any solutions, but it does help to know that we’re all in this together. And now onto the links.

June 15,2007

blue jay. (c) Heather Kaiser

The Wednesday Four

All of these links, aside from the one immediately under this paragraph, are from 2015. There will probably be more of these as I plow through my backlog.

Week 14 was a hot, hot mess.

Onto the links.

My birthday was Sunday and my friend and I went out for Korean BBQ. It was as delicious as it looks in the photo below.

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Birthday lunch!

A post shared by Sarah (@aclockworksub) on

The Wednesday Four

Each week  for the past 12 weeks (since the November) Amy Siskind has been making posts that talk about what has changed since Tr*mp was elected president. I’m going to try to remember to share each of these (starting with week 12) as an extra link at the beginning of this post. Please read through the link.

» Week 12: Experts in authoritarianism advise to keep a list of things subtly changing around you, so you’ll remember.

Now, onto other links, some of these will be timely, some of them will not.

  • More Than Likable Enough: I like Hillary Clinton. And I’m convinced that saying so can be a subversive act. (Slate) Note: this is old, but take a moment to think how much different (better) the state of this country would be had the election gone differently.
  • 14 Stunning Portraits Of Albania’s Few Remaining Sworn Virgins Photographer Jill Peters has dedicated her career to exploring the intersections of sexuality, gender identity, and culture — and it has taken her to some very interesting places. When she first read about a dwindling group of people in a remote part of the world who live their lives as “sworn virgins,” she pretty much knew where her next trip would be. (Refinery29)

After the Rain

After the Rain © Adrian Lim

The Wednesday Four (12/07/16)

It’s been a month since the election. That’s pretty much all I’ve got. Onto the links.

  • Blade Runner: the typography and design (Typeset in the Future)

My Grape Jelly Raider

Male baltimore oriole in my back yard (c) Tina :0)

The Wednesday Four (11/23/16)

Today’s links are all about the media. I still haven’t decided which media outlets to support and I am taking suggestions (note: I’m not subscribing to WAPO or NYT). Anyway, the links.

  • What Normalization Means: And so we should remain suspicious of efforts to welcome Trumpism into the fold of mainstream American ideas, particularly when normalizing him suggests the privilege to pick and choose, to infer the existence of another’s decency and humanity, to laugh, and to think that, at the end of the day, we all just want the same thing. (New Yorker)
  • Billionaires vs. the Press in the Era of Trump: A small group of superrich Americans — the president-elect among them — has laid the groundwork for an unprecedented legal assault on the media. Can they succeed? (New York Times)

 

 

The Wednesday Four (07/22/15)

Today’s links are about the brain and true crime, enjoy.

  • Boy Interrupted: One Man’s Desperate Quest to Cure His Son’s Epilepsy—With Weed (Wired)
  • The Wetsuitman: Last winter two bodies were found in Norway and the Netherlands. They were wearing identical wetsuits. The police in three countries were involved in the case, but never managed to identify them. This is the story of who they were. (Dagbladet)

Peering Through The Long Grass

Peering Through The Long Grass (photo (c) A Guy Taking Photos)