The Wednesday Four

This weeks links are about Mars, the fact that your TV is spying on you, among other things. First, the state of the nation (not good):

Week 13 and we’ve already started the normalizing.

Onto the link:

No picture this week, instead enjoy this trailer for Bill Nye’s new Netflix show. I can’t wait.

The Wednesday Four (12/28/2016)

Happy week between Christmas and New Years! I hope everyone had a lovely Christmas, I know I did. If you don’t celebrate, I hope you enjoyed your Hanukkah, Kwanza, or Sunday. Happy New Year and may 2017 be better than 2016 (#lol).

The Wednesday Four (12/21/16)

Merry Christmas to those who celebrate it. Here are three politic-related (in a way) links and one that is not.

The Wednesday Four (05/04/16)

Two links from the same site this week. I try not to do it that often, but this week it couldn’t be helped. Both articles are great.

NORTH AFRICA AND EUROPE FROM SUOMI NPP

Over a period of six orbits on on February 3, 2012, the recently launched Suomi NPP satellite provided the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument enough time to gather the pixels for this synthesized view of Earth showing North Africa and southwestern Europe. Image by Norman Kuring, NASA GSFC, using dat from the VIIRS instrument abore Suomi NPP (Source)

 

The Wednesday Four (07/22/15)

Today’s links are about the brain and true crime, enjoy.

  • Boy Interrupted: One Man’s Desperate Quest to Cure His Son’s Epilepsy—With Weed (Wired)
  • The Wetsuitman: Last winter two bodies were found in Norway and the Netherlands. They were wearing identical wetsuits. The police in three countries were involved in the case, but never managed to identify them. This is the story of who they were. (Dagbladet)
Peering Through The Long Grass

Peering Through The Long Grass (photo (c) A Guy Taking Photos)

 

The Wednesday Four (07/08/15)

That Oliver Sacks article might make you cry, FYI. Also, if you’ve never read one of his books, you totally should. He’s an excellent author.

Untitled

This is a African Fennec Fox, The Cleveland Zoo has one of these. They just had one of these on a local morning tv program. The zoo handler said they are about 3lbs. They have the big ears because it keeps them cool in Africa. (photo & caption (c) yvonne n)

The Wednesday Four (05/27/15)

Today’s links deal with issues of death, chemistry and awesomeness. Who  knew?

Elements with the greatest supply risk. Red is high, blue is low.

Elements with the greatest supply risk. Red is high, blue is low.

The Wednesday Four (05/13/15)

These links are depressing in a variety of ways, except for that first one.

I just want to state, for the record, that I had no idea that the Brontosaurus had stopped existing, as it were, for so long. I thought it, like Pluto losing it’s planet status, was a relatively new thing. Surprise! Who knew? Not me.

Hey Brontosaurus by Roger Jones

Hey Brontosaurus by Roger Jones

The Thursday Ten

Some of these are older links I’d forgotten to share before. Also, the Vincent van Gogh link is very long, but fascinating. There are also some pretty great links, like the one about cats and then there’s that one about Thor’s hammer.

  • NCIS: Provence: The Van Gogh: Mystery For many decades, suicide was the unquestioned final chapter of Vincent van Gogh’s legend. But in their 2011 book, Pulitzer Prize-winning biographers Steven Naifeh and Gregory White Smith offered a far more plausible scenario—that Van Gogh was killed—only to find themselves under attack. Now, with the help of a leading forensic expert, the authors take their case a step further. (Vanity Fair)
  • Why Banksy Is (Probably) a Woman: The world’s foremost street artist is a social justice warrior and a viral media master. She could be anyone. (City Lab) Note: Aside from a failure to understand what graffiti (street writing) is (it is not catcalling, fyi), this article is interesting. I wouldn’t call it good, but the author makes a decent argument for Banksy’s gender.
  • William Gibson: I never imagined Facebook The brilliant science-fiction novelist who imagined the Web tells Salon how writers missed social media’s rise (Salon) Note: My favorite article of the week because William Gibson. If you don’t understand … you don’t know me very well.

Monday Links

Here are some links that I’ve come across over the past few days.

The Apollo 11 Journey in Photographs (The Atlantic): Some pretty cool photographs of Apollo and the day Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walked on the moon. Including the photo to the left

Alone in the Ocean (Now I Know): A short article about a whale, called the 52 Hertz whale, who speaks at a different frequency than other whales and is, therefore, forever alone. Poor guy, though he/she seems to be surviving just fine, somehow.

Jane McGonigal: The game that can give you 10 extra years of life (TED): I think I was linked to this via Library Link of the Day, but I don’t remember. It’s a 20 minute video about McGonigal, who designs games, and figured out a way to make our lives better. I actually recommend the video because it’s interesting, kind of cute and really fun(ny).

Guest Post: The Truth Behind TSA Backscanners: Are They Safe? (Smaller Questions): A surprisingly interesting and easy to understand post about the scanners we go through at the airport. I completely agree with this part of the post as well:

The individual cancer risk from this amount of radiation pales in comparison to lifestyle risk factors for cancer like smoking, diet, and fitness.  However, one of the central tenets of radiation protection is a concept called ALARA – As Low As Reasonably Achievable.  The idea is that one should only use as much radiation as is needed, and no more.  Given that there is a perfectly good alternative that doesn’t use ionizing radiation (microwave-based scanner), in my opinion it is irresponsible to use radiation when it isn’t needed.

Living With Voices: A new way to deal with disturbing voices offers hope for those with other forms of psychosis (The American Scholar): I’m not that familiar with people who hear voices (external or internal), aside from what I’ve seen in TV shows (mostly likely wrong, too) so this article was both interesting and enlightening.

Deniers, disgust, and defamation (Bad Astronomy): My favorite Astronomer, Phil Plait, talks about the anti-science movement and how they’ve taken to personally attacking scientists (because they can’t attack the science). It’s pretty gross, but at least people are standing up against them.

And, finally, have a picture of a newly born baby manatee (to a rescued mother) and a series of photos of Kang Daesung, my favorite member of the Korean group Big Bang, from a recent concert in Shanghai, China.