Weekend Reads: 9/25/2020

It’s been a week, hasn’t it? On the global scale things aren’t great. Everyone’s experiences are different and several people I know, including my extended family (as I’ve mentioned) have suffered loses due to this pandemic. But you know what all of this means? It means we don’t give up.

I know we want to. I’ve seen it all over Twitter and Facebook. RBG’s death has really hit a lot of people hard, myself included. But we cannot let this tragedy (for that’s what it is) stop us from fighting. We must donate money to Democratic candidates and to bail funds and abortion funds. And most important, come November 3rd, all American citizens must vote.

The only way this country is going to make it is if we vote Biden/Harris. And, if you can, give some money to them. But please, VOTE and keep fighting.

Kévin Reza: I haven’t seen a lot of solidarity in cycling (cyclingnews)

B&B Hotels-Vital Concept rider on Black Lives Matter and racing for the smallest team in the Tour de France

The Wrong Fires (On the Media)

What happens when minor stories detract media attention from urgent crises.

The Glorious RBG (Intelligencer | NY Magazine)

I learned, while writing about her, that her precision disguised her warmth.

A 5-Decade-Long Friendship That Began With A Phone Call (NPR)

In 1971, newly assigned to cover the Supreme Court, I was reading a brief in what would ultimately be the landmark case of Reed v. Reed. It argued that the 14th Amendment’s equal protection clause applied to women. I didn’t understand some of the brief, so I flipped to the front to see who the author was, and I placed a call to Rutgers law professor Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Here are a three Ginsberg related things to watch. I’ve seen RBG and it is fantastic. The UMS newsletter shared the 2015 interview.

Sam Neill On His Social Media Fame: “If It’s Cheered Up One Or Two People, Then My Time Was Well Spent” (GQ Australia)

Easily one of the country’s finest (adopted) actors and certainly among its most admired, Sam Neill has also spent four decades as one of its most prolific. But as the film industry ground to a halt, we caught up with Neill to discuss this new age of uncertainty, the future of the arts and his recent foray into social media stardom.

Note: These next two articles go together. Read the short story first, and then the response essay.

“How to Pay Reparations: a Documentary” by Tochi Onyebuchi (Slate)

In this new short story, a city tries to use an algorithm to pay reparations.

Racism Cannot Be Reduced to Mere Computation by Charlton McIlwain (Slate)

No amount of A.I. can save white America’s soul, or restore Black Americans’ long-foreclosed-upon and deferred dreams.

Note: Two related articles from Vice by James Clifton

2012 Is Bullshit; 2020 Is When We’ll Really Be in Trouble

Scientist Peter Turchin’s work suggests that the next state of upheaval in the US is set to hit in 2020 based on historical violence cycles.

The Scientist Who Predicted 2020’s Political Unrest On What Comes Next

Catching up with Peter Turchin, whose theory predicted a period of political violence starting this year.

Why Every City Feels the Same Now (Atlantic – $$)

Glass-and-steel monoliths replaced local architecture. It’s not too late to go back.

Let this video inspire you.

Have a good weekend, everyone!

The Wednesday Four

This weeks links are about Mars, the fact that your TV is spying on you, among other things. First, the state of the nation (not good):

Week 13 and we’ve already started the normalizing.

Onto the link:

No picture this week, instead enjoy this trailer for Bill Nye’s new Netflix show. I can’t wait.

The Wednesday Four (12/28/2016)

Happy week between Christmas and New Years! I hope everyone had a lovely Christmas, I know I did. If you don’t celebrate, I hope you enjoyed your Hanukkah, Kwanza, or Sunday. Happy New Year and may 2017 be better than 2016 (#lol).

The Wednesday Four (12/21/16)

Merry Christmas to those who celebrate it. Here are three politic-related (in a way) links and one that is not.

The Wednesday Four (05/04/16)

Two links from the same site this week. I try not to do it that often, but this week it couldn’t be helped. Both articles are great.

NORTH AFRICA AND EUROPE FROM SUOMI NPP

Over a period of six orbits on on February 3, 2012, the recently launched Suomi NPP satellite provided the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument enough time to gather the pixels for this synthesized view of Earth showing North Africa and southwestern Europe. Image by Norman Kuring, NASA GSFC, using dat from the VIIRS instrument abore Suomi NPP (Source)

 

The Wednesday Four (07/22/15)

Today’s links are about the brain and true crime, enjoy.

  • Boy Interrupted: One Man’s Desperate Quest to Cure His Son’s Epilepsy—With Weed (Wired)
  • The Wetsuitman: Last winter two bodies were found in Norway and the Netherlands. They were wearing identical wetsuits. The police in three countries were involved in the case, but never managed to identify them. This is the story of who they were. (Dagbladet)

Peering Through The Long Grass

Peering Through The Long Grass (photo (c) A Guy Taking Photos)

 

The Wednesday Four (07/08/15)

That Oliver Sacks article might make you cry, FYI. Also, if you’ve never read one of his books, you totally should. He’s an excellent author.

Untitled

This is a African Fennec Fox, The Cleveland Zoo has one of these. They just had one of these on a local morning tv program. The zoo handler said they are about 3lbs. They have the big ears because it keeps them cool in Africa. (photo & caption (c) yvonne n)

The Wednesday Four (05/27/15)

Today’s links deal with issues of death, chemistry and awesomeness. Who  knew?

Elements with the greatest supply risk. Red is high, blue is low.

Elements with the greatest supply risk. Red is high, blue is low.

The Wednesday Four (05/13/15)

These links are depressing in a variety of ways, except for that first one.

I just want to state, for the record, that I had no idea that the Brontosaurus had stopped existing, as it were, for so long. I thought it, like Pluto losing it’s planet status, was a relatively new thing. Surprise! Who knew? Not me.

Hey Brontosaurus by Roger Jones

Hey Brontosaurus by Roger Jones

The Thursday Ten

Some of these are older links I’d forgotten to share before. Also, the Vincent van Gogh link is very long, but fascinating. There are also some pretty great links, like the one about cats and then there’s that one about Thor’s hammer.

  • NCIS: Provence: The Van Gogh: Mystery For many decades, suicide was the unquestioned final chapter of Vincent van Gogh’s legend. But in their 2011 book, Pulitzer Prize-winning biographers Steven Naifeh and Gregory White Smith offered a far more plausible scenario—that Van Gogh was killed—only to find themselves under attack. Now, with the help of a leading forensic expert, the authors take their case a step further. (Vanity Fair)
  • Why Banksy Is (Probably) a Woman: The world’s foremost street artist is a social justice warrior and a viral media master. She could be anyone. (City Lab) Note: Aside from a failure to understand what graffiti (street writing) is (it is not catcalling, fyi), this article is interesting. I wouldn’t call it good, but the author makes a decent argument for Banksy’s gender.
  • William Gibson: I never imagined Facebook The brilliant science-fiction novelist who imagined the Web tells Salon how writers missed social media’s rise (Salon) Note: My favorite article of the week because William Gibson. If you don’t understand … you don’t know me very well.