The Wednesday Four (09/02/15)

The first article in this week’s post is very relevant, considering how much news we get from Facebook. As an aside, I get most of my news in my inbox (newsletters) and via twitter, less so from Facebook, but still some.

LOVE

LOVE (photo (c) abon)

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The Wednesday Four (07/29/15)

I really like the second article because I find any discussions about evolution to be interesting.

  • The Post-Ownership Society How the “sharing economy” allows Millennials to cope with downward mobility, and also makes them poorer. (Washington Monthly)
White arctic wolf

White arctic wolf: Very nice Arctic wolf (originally from Canada), relaxing on a rock (photo (c) Tambako The Jaguar)

The Wednesday Four (07/15/15)

I guess I should apologize for having three Buzzfeed links, but that would require me to be sorry about it. Which I’m not. Also, there’s a link from Fusion, which if you don’t read, you should. Their stuff’s pretty interesting. My only concession about Buzzfeed is that their headlines suck, but then again everyone’s using headlines that are basically clickbait — does that make it okay? I don’t know, but I don’t have to like it.

IMG_2335

Lake Michigan, South Haven, MI (photo (c) Eve Hermann

The Wednesday Four (07/01/15)

A lot of these are depressing. Apologies in advance. To make up for it, there’s a picture of a kitten at the bottom of this post.

  • Split Image: On Instagram, Madison Holleran’s life looked ideal: Star athlete, bright student, beloved friend. But the photos hid the reality of someone struggling to go on. (ESPN)

 

Our new kitten Shetti

Our new kitten Shetti (c) Merlijn Hoek

 

The Wednesday Four: (06/03/15)

What a strange mix of links today.

Of those 100 books, I’ve read four: Eleanor & Park, Daughter of Smoke & Bone, Before I Fall and Station Eleven. Of those, I would only recommend two of them. Before I Fall was an enjoyable fantasy-esque novel about a girl who only has one day to live. Station Eleven is a truly excellent piece of dystopian fiction set in the Northern Lower Peninsula of Michigan, Hollywood and Toronto. I cannot recommend Station Eleven enough. Go read that one.

I don’t remember why I don’t like Daughter of Smoke & Bone, except that I didn’t find it interesting in the least and wasn’t fond of the main character. I did like Eleanor & Park, though I didn’t love it (I also didn’t like Rowell’s other YA offering, Fangirl). But a friend of mine sent me a link (I’ve long since lost it) that explained why E&P is a terrible novel and the more I think about the book, the more I agree. Though I can’t find the original link, here are some other reviews that sum up why I no longer like nor can recommend E&P.

As for the rest of the list? I can think of plenty of YA, Science Fiction and Fantasy titles that should be on that list that aren’t. I don’t really understand why there are so few of them, but there are some popular (to library patrons, at least) titles on the list. It’s worth checking out, even if I think they give short shrift to YA, SF&F books.

The Wednesday Four (04/29/15)

Today’s links want you to binge watch, I think you should just marathon. Also, as an aside, there’s a link here from Vice and while I’m not a huge fan of the site, this article is actually quite interest.

  • HBO to Netflix: Bring It On How HBO’s quest to win the streaming wars becamse a binge-worthy drama as juicy as Game of Thrones. (Fast Company)

I would be interested in HBO if they included TBS, TNT and TCM content — except for two things. The first is that, as of launch, it will only work on Apple device (which means I can’t watch it on my computer, tablet or TV) and it costs $14.99 a month — which I find to be a ripoff. Sure, I’d like to get the content, but I can get two difference services (Hulu+ and Netflix) for only a couple of bucks more. That’s not to say that I don’t pay for other services, I do (Dramafever and, at some point, I’ll start paying for SoompiTV again), I’m just saying that $14.99/month is way too much (even Prime’s $99/year is cheaper, when you break it down). C’mon, HBO, make it cheaper, you won’t regret it.

The Wednesday Four (04/22/15)

Hey, look, some links!

  • The future of loneliness  As we moved our lives online, the internet promised an end to isolation. But can we find real intimacy amid shifting identities and permanent surveillance? (Guardian)

As someone who has a social life divided by the internet and the physical world, I found the first article to be fascinating, if somewhat ill-informed. I truly believe that friendships you make online are just as real as those you make in person. Actually, I don’t just believe this, I know it. I have several very close friends who I only know through the internet. I’ve met a couple of them in person and I was the bridesmaid in another’s wedding. But there are others who I may never meet, as we live oceans apart. This doesn’t devalue our friendships in any way, shape or form.

I believe the crux of the problem is relying on the idea that followers on social media are the same as tangible friends — the ones you talk to (you may email them every day, or every week, month or even once or twice a year — but they are your friends and not just people you happen to know). I have over 100 followers (each) on twitter, tumblr and on Facebook. I would only consider a handful of these to be actual friends and of those, even fewer who are close friends. If you confuse friendship and followers, then you’re missing two things: the point of social media is not to create a super large group of actual friends and friendships cannot be bound or determined by anything other than the relationship between two people. I feel that the author, at the end of the article, came to realize that it is the quality of the friendships, not the quantity of the ‘friends’ that really matters.