The Wednesday Four (09/09/15)

I hope everyone had a nice, long Labor Day weekend, if you celebrate it, that is (or, you know, live in the US). We have new New York Times links today. And yes, before you ask, I am a Serena Williams fan.

  • Like It’s 1999: On Serena Williams’s Dominance and the Passage of Time (Grantland)
  • The Agency: From a nondescript office building in St. Petersburg, Russia, an army of well-paid “trolls” has tried to wreak havoc all around the Internet — and in real-life American communities. (NYTimes)

Serena Williams

Serena Williams  Day 9 action at the 2015 BNP Paribas Open. (photo (c) mirsasha)

Thursday Ten (makes a comeback)

Yes, I’m back! With more depressing articles for your weekend. Please don’t hate me too much. This week there’s an article that will make you cry, another that will make you angry and one that will make you wonder what the world has come to. But, if you make it to the end, there’s some fun and interesting things waiting for you.

  • EXPOSED After an accidental needle stab, a doctor’s Ebola watch begins (Washington Post)
  • On Kindness: My mother is sick. (Matter/Medium) This is a phenomenal and heartbreaking read.
  • The Art of Not Working at Work At first, the ability to check email, read ESPN, or browse Zappos while on the job may feel like a luxury. But in time, many crave more meaningful—and more demanding—responsibilities. (The Atlantic)
  • The greatest story Reddit ever told (Kernal/Daily Dot) Note: I’m not a fan of Reddit at all, I rarely ever visit there, but this story is fascinating and, strangely, heartwarming.

Bonus:

  • The Internet Arcade: The Internet Arcade is a web-based library of arcade (coin-operated) video games from the 1970s through to the 1990s, emulated in JSMAME, part of the JSMESS software package. Containing hundreds of games ranging through many different genres and styles, the Arcade provides research, comparison, and entertainment in the realm of the Video Game Arcade. (Internet Archive)
  • These Secret Cold War Radio Stations Are Still Broadcasting: In the early days of espionage, long before the advent of burner phones, satcoms, and other modern-day spy gadgets, getting word to field agents—especially those working behind the Iron Curtain—proved a dangerous game with global consequences should the agent’s cover be blown. But that’s where number stations, and their uncrackable radio codes, come in. (Gizmodo)

Thursday Links

A collection of interesting links I’ve read throughout the week (or, really, since the last time I made a links post).

  • The Ghost Files: US historians have long complained about gaps in the National Archives. Can big-data analysis show what kinds of information the government is keeping classified? (Columbia)
  • China Gives Hong Kong Its Worst: If China wants Hong Kong residents to stop taking to the streets in protest, it should start picking better leaders. Of course, that’s exactly why an estimated 300,000 demonstrated yesterday and almost 800,000 voted in a recent unofficial referendum: to gain the right to choose the city’s chief executive officer. (Bloomberg View)
  • Hobby Lobby Is Only the Beginning: A country that cannot even agree on the idea of religious accommodation, let alone on what terms, is unlikely to agree on what to do next. A country in which many states cannot manage to pass basic anti-discrimination laws covering sexual orientation is one whose culture wars may be beyond the point of compromise. And a nation whose marketplace itself is viewed, for better or worse, as a place to fight both those battles rather than to escape from them is still less likely to find surcease from struggle. (New York Times)
  • The Urgent Need to Shield Journalism in the Age of Surveillance: The media landscape has been transformed by NSA contractor Edward Snowden’s decision to leak a vast cache of documents to select journalists, notably at the Guardian and the Washington Post, which made global headlines a year ago this month. And “the new challenge this year is how to maintain the Internet as somewhere for free expression and innovation,” as Michael Maness, VP of journalism and innovation at the Knight Foundation, said. (PBS)