The Wednesday Four

Here is Week 23. What I did this week was attend the March for Science in downtown Detroit with some friends. It was good, there were some decent speakers and we walked down Woodward. You can see some of the photos I took over on my Instagram.

As for the links? Everything old is new again as in I’m digging in the bottom of my pile of articles to read and have pulled four. Please enjoy them!

  • Fewer Americans Are Visiting Local Libraries—and Technology Isn’t to Blame
    Only one trend is closely associated with their use. (The Atlantic) Note: The reason may not surprise you!
  • A Lost Scottish Island, George Orwell, and the Future of Maps A 141 square-mile island vanished from Google Maps, and the company has yet to restore it. What do glitches mean for little-known places? (The Atlantic | CityLab) Note: If you look on google maps, Jura is back, but this article is still fun and interesting.
  • Taxonomy: The spy who loved frogs To track the fate of threatened species, a young scientist must follow the jungle path of a herpetologist who led a secret double life. (Nature) Note: I recommend listening to the podcast (about 13 minutes) as well as reading the article. Also, I have mixed feelings about specimen collection and those feelings were not changed by this article.
  • How Andrew Carnegie Turned His Fortune Into A Library Legacy (NPR) Note: Two library articles in one post! You’d think I was still a librarian.
Howell Carnegie District Library

Howell Carnegie District Library in Howell, MI. Photo (c) Paul Cooper

A few years ago a (now former) coworker and I went to Howell to hear an author speak and we walked to this library, although it was closed and we couldn’t go inside. Maybe next time.

The Wednesday Four

Week 22 brings us every closer to World War 3 or the end of the world, or perhaps both (or neither, should we be lucky — are you feeling lucky?)

To make up for that, have an article about The Rock aka Dwayne Johnson and some really beautiful artwork of birds. And some other stuff, too.

  • Toxic Shock: Why This Woman Is Suing a Tampon Company After Losing Her Leg (Vice)
  • The Lock Pickers Victorian England made the strongest locks in the world—until an American showed up and promised he could pick them. (Slate)
Baseball

Baseball (c) Andy B

The Wednesday Four

If you skip these weekly posts I link to, you shouldn’t. I have been skimming them, but for week 21, I read it all the way through. I realized several things while reading it, the most important was how much I have already normalized, as Amy describes it, the Trump regime. While I try never to refer to him by his full title and I shudder when I hear others do it, sometimes I do forget or ignore how bad things are. Reading week 21 made me realize that, well, things are bad and they’re getting worse. Please remember that this is not the world we want and yet, here we are.

Anyway, your links this week:

  • Redux: You’ve got mail, you idiot! This post originally ran on October 26, 2011, back when Donald Trump was relentlessly propagating an easily debunked conspiracy theory about President Obama. As we ponder the triumph of “alternative facts,” it’s worth considering what makes bullshit so appealing and why it’s so hard to debunk. (The Last Word On Nothing)
  • Letter to My Younger Self by Pete Sampras (The Players Tribune) Note: For most of the time he was active, Pete was one of my favorite tennis players. The others are current player Gilles Simon and legend Bjorn Borg.

The Wednesday Four

A lot happened in Week 19. One of the things was good, the rest … well, you know. And on this line of thinking, there is so much news that a few minutes, an hour, a whole night, away from your phone (or the news in general) feels like a vacation. My dad visited me last weekend and I didn’t spend a lot of time on my phone or looking at the news, but when I did, it was like getting crushed. BuzzFeed wrote a really great article about this, which you can read:

It doesn’t necessarily offer any solutions, but it does help to know that we’re all in this together. And now onto the links.

June 15,2007

blue jay. (c) Heather Kaiser

The Wednesday Four

Last week was something else. Wednesday was A Day Without Women, our President released his health care “plan” and so many things happened. I missed a lot of it due to being out of town because Southeast Michigan, where I live, was hit with a huge windstorm and myself, along with around a million others, lost power. I have power again and it’s very nice. It was a sharp reminder how quickly our world can change. Stay safe, everyone. Stay warm (or cool, depending where you are).

Here is week 17.

Due to the above mentioned issues, I haven’t read many articles recently, so here are more old ones. Including one about one of my most favorite movies, Chungking Express. If you haven’t seen it, please do, it’s fantastic.

  • In Dreams: 20 Years of ‘Chungking Express’ (mxdwn)
  • William Gibson Sees the Future: But he’s not trying to predict it. (Slate) Note: Gibson is my favorite author and I loved The Peripheral, which is what this article is partially about. 
  • Did My Best Friend Really Know Me? For 27 years, the writer had a dutiful relationship with her most devoted friend. Only later did she question who needed who more. (Dame)
fullwidth.982cfbd5

Tony Leung Chiu Wai in Chungking Express

chungkingexp1024

Faye Wong in Chungking Express

The Wednesday Four

Last week, huh? I’m ready to watch Hunt For Red October or some Sean Connery as James Bond movies. Anyway.

Each week things get worse and worse: Week 16

The links. Please enjoy the story of Keanu Reeves and then read Gail Simone’s Grand Unified Keanu Theory. And yes, I am a fan and have been for quite some time.

  • The Myth of Police Reform: The real problem is the belief that all our social problems can be solved with force. (The Atlantic)
  • Scorched Earth, 2200AD: Climate change has done its worst, and now just 500 million humans remain on lifeboats in the north. How do they survive? (Aeon)
Jack Rabbit

Jack Rabbit (c) Linda Tanner

The Wednesday Four

Two things about this week’s links. The first is that I will forever have a huge soft spot for the movie Hackers. I know that it’s not really a great movie, but I adore it and I cannot imagine growing up without having watched it. My sister and I still quote it to each other (along with another cult classic from our youth, Empire Records). There is something endearing and enduring about Hackers, it was in many ways such an innocent time, too. The second thing is that I adore the late Oliver Sacks and his writing. If you’ve never read any of his books, do yourself a favor and read one. It could be one of his science books, or something else of his entirely. Please, go read his writing. It’s great way to remember him.

Week 15 is all about Russia and intolerance.

The links:

  • ‘Hackers’ at 20: How a 20-year-old, mostly inaccurate flop predicted the future, reshaped sci-fi, and won over the real hacker community. (Passcode/Christian Science Monitor)
  • Hoax hunter: I bust people who fake illnesses online (Fusion)
  • The Website MLB Couldn’t Buy Meet Durland and Darvin, the Hummer-driving, rock-and-roll-playing, real-life twins keeping Twins.com in the family and out of Minnesota’s baseball mitt (Grantland)
  • How Oliver Sacks Helped Introduce The World To Autism Autism and its many forms may be widely discussed today, but it wasn’t until the famed neurologist and writer told the story of identical twins George and Charles Fin in his book The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat. (Buzzfeed)
20170217_213124

B1A4 on 02/17/2017 at The Copernicus Center outside of Chicago, IL (taken by me)