Thurday Ten

Today’s bonus links aren’t as fun as previous weeks. Instead, we have an interesting (if with a happy ending) story about the impact of social media and how to follow Scotland’s historic independence referendum. A note that some of the main links might be triggering to victims of domestic violence/etc.

  • Ray Rice and His Rage: The sordid Ray Rice scandal has opened a much-needed dialogue about domestic violence. (New York Times)
  • ‘What is reality?’: A Q&A with the artist who used social media and Photoshop to fake an epic trip even her parents fell for (Washington Post)
  • Comment sections are poison: handle with care or remove them  Comments are often regarded as a right but they can do more harm than good. In the absence of strict moderation, we’d be much better off without them. (Guardian)
  • When You Can’t Afford Sleep: Many low-income workers get just four or five hours of rest each day. Research shows their bodies might never recover. (The Atlantic)
  • Should We All Take a Bit of Lithium? The idea of putting a mind-altering drug in the drinking water is the stuff of sci-fi, terrorist plots and totalitarian governments. Considering the outcry that occurred when putting fluoride in the water was first proposed, one can only imagine the furor that would ensue if such a thing were ever suggested.The debate, however, is moot. It’s a done deal. Mother Nature has already put a psychotropic drug in the drinking water, and that drug is lithium. Although this fact has been largely ignored for over half a century, it appears to have important medical implications. (New York Times)
  • Ticks and Cowboys:  A handful of federal agents stand between the U.S. and a devastating pest. (Modern Farmer)
  • Smartphones Are Used To Stalk, Control Domestic Abuse Victims: But there’s another kind of privacy concern that is a lot more intimate. You could call it Little Brother, though it’s really more like husbands and wives, lovers and exes who secretly watch their partners — from a distance. They are cyberstalking — using digital tools that are a lot cheaper than hiring a private detective. (NPR)

Bonus:

Links: 08/08-08/14

Bad news, y’all: everyone should change their passwords again. I know, I’ve told you to do this once, but it’s time to do it again. Now, moving on. Remember, last week, when I said I wanted to go see One Direction this weekend? I’m going! I’m excited.

This week’s links consist of everything from the death of Robin Williams to racism to Ebola. But if you’re feeling a little down, skip to the end, where you’ll find articles about chemistry robots, Murakami novels, and some extraordinary pictures. Plus, of course, the Great Emu War.

Russian Hackers Probably Have Your Passwords. Now What?: Like many people, your first question is probably whether or not you were included in that dragnet. Hold Security, the Milwaukee-based security firm that uncovered the hack, says you can fork over $120 for an annual subscription to find out in the next 60 days if you were affected. The opportunistic move cast doubt on initial reports of the breach, but prominent cybersecurity experts have confirmed them to be accurate.  At this point, you should just assume you were hacked. (TechCrunch)

In Fatal Flash, Gaza Psychologist Switches Roles, Turning Into a Trauma Victim: Hassan al-Zeyada has spent decades counseling fellow residents of the Gaza Strip who experience psychological trauma. Now, as he prepares to aid his neighbors after a new round of combat and carnage, he has a challenging new patient: himself. (New York Times)

Kurdistan: The Best Hope for What is Left of Iraq: There must be urgency about this. Kurdistan is in clear and imminent danger. We surely don’t want to wait thirty years for a declassified CIA document that concedes that backing Kurdistan could have boosted stability but was flunked at great cost. (Rudaw)

Telling white people the criminal justice system is racist makes them like it more: A new study suggests that highlighting racism in the criminal justice system is not the answer, and in fact pushes white voters in the opposite direction. Even when whites believe the current laws are too harsh, they’re less likely to support changing the law if they’re reminded that the current prison population is disproportionately black. (Vox)

The real story behind “secret menus” is the key to hacking them: Ask a barista for a cotton candy Frappuccino, for example, and she’ll create this unofficial favorite by adding raspberry syrup to a Vanilla Bean Frappuccino, which is one of the company’s official offerings, an icy and sweet blended drink topped with whipped cream. Knowing how to ask for these twists, or “secret menu” items, is half the fun. (Quartz) Note: This is one of the things I’m not brave enough to do. Not that I’d even want to, if I was.

You can’t win a Twitter fight: I’ve had my fair share of Twitter spats and can confirm it’s an absolutely terrible venue for debate. Tone, nuance, context — all of that goes out the window. Even the most remotely controversial point is destined to be misconstrued. It’s notable that when these debates finally move to email — that is to say, out of the public realm — they become far more respectful and good-willed. (Politico)

Is Sunscreen A Lifesaver Or A Poison: As to whether I should be slathering my kid with sunscreen or not, the good news is that I’m not causing any damage by doing so, and I’m certainly sparing her the painful sunburns of my youth. On the other hand, it may be dangerous to be lulled into thinking that sun exposure is without risk when she wears sunscreen. Protective clothing, hats and shade may have as much — or more — of a direct role to play. Perhaps it’s time for another full-body bathing suit. (FiveThirtyEight)

Plot Thickens as 900 Writers Battle Amazon: Douglas Preston, who summers in this coastal hamlet, is a best-selling writer — or was, until Amazon decided to discourage readers from buying books from his publisher, Hachette, as a way of pressuring it into giving Amazon a better deal on e-books. So he wrote an open letter to his readers asking them to contact Jeff Bezos, Amazon’s chief executive, demanding that Amazon stop using writers as hostages in its negotiations. (New York Times)

Timeline of China’s Social Media Crackdowns (Wall Street Journal) Note: I’ve occasionally considered signing up for a weibo account (I like a lot of Chinese/etc singers and actors), but the real name thing has always put me off.

Ebola in Africa and the U.S.: A Curation: That I am anti-Ebola panic — and especially anti-Ebola media scrum, which was disgraceful — does not mean I am not concerned about Ebola where it is authentically a problem, which is in the expanding epidemic in West Africa. It is a dreadful outbreak, it needs attention, and it says something ugly about us as a society that we only really noticed it when two Westerners were injured by it. But, again: The conditions that are pushing that epidemic along do not exist in the US. (Wired) Note: I haven’t read all of the links within this post, but her article itself is worth reading on it’s own.

About Michael Brown’s murder:

Outrage in Ferguson after police shooting of unarmed teenager Michael Brown: On August 9, Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager, was killed by a police officer in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson, MO. Eyewitnesses to the shooting report that Brown was killed while attempting to surrender, but police say that Brown assaulted the officer before the shooting. (VOX)

#IfTheyGunnedMeDown and What Hashtag Activism Does Right: Social media protests have their limits, but one thing they’re very, very good at is grassroots media criticism. (Time) Note: For pictures from the hashtag, go here. These are powerful, thought-provoking photos.

Black Residents In Ferguson, Missouri, Are Stopped And Arrested Far More Than Whites:  But a higher percentage of white residents have contraband, according to a racial profiling report from the Missouri Attorney General’s Office. (Buzzfeed)

Why Did Michael Brown Die in Ferguson?: Michael Brown didn’t die in the dark. He was eighteen years old, walking down a street in Ferguson, Missouri, from his apartment to his grandmother’s, at 2:15 on a bright Saturday afternoon. He was, for a young man, exactly where he should be—among other things, days away from his first college classes.  (New Yorker)

Social media posts from scene of Ferguson shooting (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)

Robin Williams, an Improvisational Genius, Forever Present in the Moment: Part of the shock of his death on Monday came from the fact that he had been on — ubiquitous, self-reinventing, insistently present — for so long. On Twitter, mourners dated themselves with memories of the first time they had noticed him.  (New York Times)

Suicide Rates Rise Sharply in U.S.: Suicide rates among middle-aged Americans have risen sharply in the past decade, prompting concern that a generation of baby boomers who have faced years of economic worry and easy access to prescription painkillers may be particularly vulnerable to self-inflicted harm.  (New York Times)

What’s Wrong With Comcast?: The story of a company that’s too big to function. (The Atlantic)

Privacy as a premium: Why it’s time to say goodbye to the free internet (The Next Web)

The female Pinterest engineer who pressed tech giants to air embarrassing diversity numbers: Before the recent wave of big technology companies releasing diversity data, there was a one-woman effort by Tracy Chou, a software engineer at the social bookmarking website Pinterest. She issued a call last fall for hard numbers showing how many women engineers worked at tech companies. (San Francisco Business Times)

In Defense of Passwords: They’re inconvenient and insecure, but the alternatives are worse. (Slate)

Blue Is For Boys, Pink Is For Girls: See Children Surrounded By Their Color-Coded Toys: A series of images from South Korean photographer JeongMee Yoon shows exactly how much things have changed today, after manufacturers and marketers made the arbitrary choice to assign pink to girls. For the last nine years, Yoon has been photographing toddlers surrounded by their “favorite” colors–little girls, dressed in pink, blending in with a sea of pink Hello Kitty and princess gear, and little boys in rooms filled with blue Lego and trains. (Fast Company/Co.Exist)

The Great Emu War: In which some large, flightless birds unwittingly foiled the Australian Army (Scientific American) Note: Who HASN’T heard of the Great Emu War???

‘I’m pretty terrified’: Scientists set to excavate ‘Natural trap cave’ where bones of tens of thousands of animals are piled at least 10 metres deep (National Post)

Organic synthesis: The robo-chemist: The race is on to build a machine that can synthesize any organic compound. It could transform chemistry. (Nature)

The 10 Best Haruki Murakami Book: My own favorites are chosen on a “gut” level; I liked these works because they awakened something in me as a reader, spoke to me about things that were already going on my mind, maybe only subconsciously. Some are powerfully entertaining, others just powerful. All seem to connect to an enduring thematic thread of identity, its construction and its preservation. (Publishers Weekly) Note: Of the ten, I’ve read 7. Of the three I haven’t read, the two earliest ones I have on ebook, but haven’t gotten to yet and #5 hasn’t been published in English in the US quite yet. Soon, though.

The Beautiful Junkyard Where Bolivia’s Trains Were Left to Rot: They’re rusted out, long ago stripped for useful parts. Covered in graffiti—some of it pretty good—they’re strangely beautiful relics of an industry left behind. (Wired)

Friday Links

  • The Chinese artist Liu Bolin's latest project in Beijing is documented by Jason Lee from Reuters. Liu is known as the invisible man for using painted-on camouflage to blend into the background of his photographs (via The Guardian)

    The Chinese artist Liu Bolin’s latest project in Beijing is documented by Jason Lee from Reuters. Liu is known as the invisible man for using painted-on camouflage to blend into the background of his photographs
    (via The Guardian)

    I’ve been to a lot of concerts, but not ones where I spent the night. But apparently people leave unbelievable messes, as seen here after the Reading Festival (Daily Mail).

  • The Twitter of Tomorrow (New Yorker): Most people noticed that Twitter started connecting the different tweets that make up a given conversation with a blue line. I noticed this and it totally confused me — I don’t like it because I don’t like Twitter messing with chronological order and the lines are actually super annoying — I’d rather they did conversations differently. I don’t care about reading other people’s conversations on my timelines most of the time. Ugh. I know, I hate change, but come on.
  • Two stories from NPR:
    • Compensation Funds For Victims Of Tragedy A ‘Small Solace’  This was a really good story I heard Sunday morning. It’s an interview with a man who hands out compensation to victims — and he talks about some of his experiences and what kind of job it is (as well as how difficult it is for victims/survivors/their families as well as himself).
    • The Voice Of Rocky And Natasha Earns An Emmy: A much happier story. I’ve always been a big fan of Rocky & Bullwinkle and it was really fun to hear this short interview with June Foray. I watched the show on Netflix, but it’s no longer streaming on there, but it is on Hulu now, so I can get my fix. And in case you were wondering, my favorite part of the show is Peabody’s Improbable History.
  • I emailed this to a bunch of people, but I’ll share it again here. A touching and pretty awesome story about a boy from Mongolia who used the internet and ended up attending MIT: The Boy Genius of Ulan Bator (NYT)
  • A new study of the snow leopard’s habitat across the Tibetan plateau has found that Tibetan Buddhist monasteries may be better equipped than formal preservation programmes to protect the endangered cats from poaching, retaliatory killing by farmers and other deadly perils. The key is their ability to extend their influence across administrative boundaries and maintain safe space for the animals.  (Tibetan monks and endangered cats via The Economist)
  • A review of The Grandmaster (which stars my favorite actor, Tony Leung Chiu Wai, and that I own and have watched, twice):  The Grandmaster: Returning to the Roots of Kung Fu (Tea Leaf Nation) I haven’t seen enough kung fu movies to review it adequately, but it doesn’t quite seem as good as the other Wong Kar Wai movies I’ve watched, though it is good. H and I saw it in Chicago (and got to see Tony do a Q&A in the theater(!) after the film) and I did notice what was missing (about 10 minutes were cut from the original, which is the version that I own). If you’re looking for a lot of kung fu action, this isn’t the movie you want. That being said, it’s a decent existential look at kung fu, which is what WKW is good at. I think it’s a good movie, I just think there’s a better movie in there, somewhere.

I know, this got kind of long, but whatever, I found a lot of good links. As a final note, here’s a commercial from Thailand that will make you cry (and then you can read more about it here, via The Diplomat):